Blackhouse bleats about wool week

10-15 October Celebrating the virtues of wool is never a chore as far as Blackhouse is concerned, it’s another fantastic opportunity to not only shout about how proud we are to be a chink in the wool chain but how this natural fibre is at the heart of everything we do...

Summer Break

Mid-August brings a little respite for the weavers and mill workers of the Outer Hebrides as production is halted for the annual summer break. Two weeks off allows time to focus on the crofts, well deserved holidays to be taken and island weather permitting, a little...

From Shearing To Stamping

Now that the shearing of sheep’s wool has taken place across the islands we thought we’d share the ten steps required in turning this 100% pure new wool, freshly washed and scoured, into the fabric we know and love, Harris Tweed. The journey begins with...

Shearing in the Sunshine

After a run of wet, windy and cold weather, the crofters of the Outer Hebrides are seeing some sunshine and double digit temperatures at long last. With a little more warmth, now is the perfect time to get rid of the winter wooly jumpers and start shearing the sheep...

Enjoying the Ride with Harris Tweed

The summer days of the Outer Hebrides are long in sunlight with their peak being reached on Midsummer’s Eve last week. In these remote northerly latitudes the sun barely sets, dipping only briefly below the horizon before rising again with the sky still glowing...

Looming behind the scenes

The original Harris Tweed loom was the beart bheag (small loom in Gaelic), a small wooden loom predominantly used prior to 1900. Made locally, it was traditionally used by women for domestic purposes. The heald shafts (na buird) were activated by four treadles...